Sicily- part 2

To pick up where I left off in part 1, we were just leaving Taormina (the world’s prettiest town).

We had a long drive from Taormina right across Sicily to our next stop in Palermo (3+ hours), so we decided to break it up with a small side trip to the Canadian War Cemetery in Agira.

While back in Catania, we had a visit to the Sicilian WWII museum. It concentrated on the Allies’ Operation Husky (the invasion and taking of Sicily) and the bombing of Sicilian towns. It was a great museum but less than one-third of the exhibits and displays had English translations. We got the gist and it was very humbling to see it from the Sicilians’ point-of-view: they appreciated the Allies helping them break their ties with Hitler, but they took heavy bombing and casualties, too. For a few weeks, we Canadians were ‘the bad guys’.




However, once the Allies won the island, the Sicilians were then glad to see the Nazis gone and didn’t mind having the Allies around for the next couple years of the war.

So now while we were driving across the island, we took the bumpy and windy 15km detour to the beautifully situated Agira War Cemetery. Agira was the Canadians’ largest battle and where they took the heaviest casualties. There are 490 men buried here, on a hill overlooking valleys, a lake, and with the mountain town of Agira on the horizon. We took our time to pay our respects.

We then continued on to Palermo but now sort of wish we hadn’t. Every trip has a low point, and Palermo was ours. Palermo is Sicily’s largest city and the one that tour guides like Rick Steves say not to miss… But there were little redeeming qualities in the city for us. It didn’t help that it was raining and cold; a Sunday, so a lot was closed or inaccessible; and we had just come from the world’s prettiest town, so our standards were set high.

Palermo was full of garbage, everywhere in the streets, litter. And shit, literally. Excuse my language, but there’s no way to delicately describe the heaps of smelly dog shit on the side of the road. I’m not talking about the little piles here and there like you encounter in Paris and most other European cities; but we passed one unpaved part of the sidewalk where a tree was growing, about 2m x 1m of no pavement (dirt, or ‘grassy’ area) and it was overflowing with dog poop. If someone tried to scoop it all, it would be 3 big black Hefty bags full, and the stench was utterly overwhelming.

We were down to our last pairs of socks and underwear but couldn’t get our clothes washed because laundromats don’t open on Sundays and our hotel didn’t accept laundry on a Sunday. We were going to do a bus tour but they barely ran on Sundays (only 2 times, not all day) and wouldn’t be worth the cost, we took cabs instead (and one cabbie ripped us off). Restaurants were hard to find that served food, not just drinks; and in the end when we got in the car to leave, our gas seemed awfully low- we think it was siphoned off!

So we didn’t love Palermo, but we got around and saw some of the bigger sites, even if just from the outside. The one place that was open and we could actually go in was the Capuchin Catacombs that Sophie read about in her kids’ Atlas Obscura (a great book for any kid interested in geography and/or seeing the world!) and wanted to see. It certainly was interesting to see but of course we couldn’t take any photos inside and we respected this rule (though again, it seems like we’re the only tourists who know how to respect things like religion and the dead).

However, please enjoy some other photos of Palermo landmarks from the outside.

The Opera House
The large cathedral. It was Sunday so there was mass. It doesn’t look anything like we’d expect inside. All white sheetrock and paint and no stained glass and stone arches like we’re used to in France and England, even older cathedrals in Canada.
The theatre near our hotel.

Those 3 photos are about the only redeeming sights and parts of Palermo I can show. We left by 9am on our check-out day and didn’t look back. The drive south-east was perilous, hilly, and full of switch-back, winding bends; but we knew we were going in the right direction to leave Palermo in our rear-view when a rainbow came out in the Sicilian countryside.

Our next stop was the tourist destination, the Valley of the Temples in Agrigento. These are Greek temple ruins built in 400-200BC on a high mountain ridge with expansive views of the valley below and the sea beyond.

This showed how they made wheels with the stones and moved the even larger stones.

It’s a long walk along the ridge and you spend a few hours there. When we started it was windy but the sun was warm. About 2/3 through, it clouded over and started to rain and just became miserable. I didn’t care then how ancient or special it all was, I couldn’t feel my feet, I could hardly walk, I just wanted to get to an exit and get out!!!

After our time in Agrigento we got back on the windy road and headed to Modica, where our agriturismo B&B (farm-stay) was just outside of.

We stayed at the Nacalino Agriturismo which simply blew us away. It is a beautiful little olive oil farm, they also grow their own vegetables and fruit (there’s a lemon tree in the courtyard) organically. Our host made us a 4-course Sicilian dinner every night with fresh, local produce. Things that didn’t come from their farm came from the neighbouring farms (there were a lot of cows around, and the next farm over looked to specialise in ricotta and mozzarella). Everything was so fresh, so authentic, and so tasty.

One of our 4-course meals. Always an antipasto plate, then pasta, then meat, then sweet.

The grounds were so lovely as well. There were friendly cats and an old golden labrador that Sophie and I liked to cuddle. We liked to walk around and explore. We had full use of the common rooms with fireplace, and we could finally get our laundry done (in fact, Tina, the proprietor, did it all for us, for free!!). I’m sure the place would be really stunning to use in the summer with the outdoor pool under the palm trees. However, being there when the pool is closed also means we get the off-season pricing.

Breakfast was a buffet just as impressive as our dinners. Fresh-made cappuccinos, oodles of home-made pastries, freshly squeezed juice, local meats and cheeses, and everything else one gets at breakfast buffets.

The food is delicious, however breakfast buffets are a ridiculous amount of work for a type-1 diabetic. The breakfast she has pictured above looks great, then we calculated it to be about 120g of carbs. Her first bolus was 17 units of insulin (at home on a regular day she usually doesn’t go over 35 units for her entire daily dose!). This was only her first pass of the buffet. I think she went over 200-250g of carbs by the time she was done breakfast. And why not, she’s in Italy, enjoy! (Just bring extra insulin!)

On New Year’s Eve day, we headed in to the old town of Modica, a UNESCO world heritage site. It was full of Baroque architecture built into the cliffsides of a gorge down to a valley. The churches were like the others we’ve seen in Sicily, so beautiful from the outside then white, painted, and overdone inside.

One of the smaller churches in town, the Church of St. Peter
We were finally in a Sicilian church without a mass going on, so we grabbed a photo. They are still beautiful, but not the same beauty we’re used to.
Sophie and me on the 250-stair climb up to the next cathedral. You can see the town carved into the cliffside behind us.
We finally made it up 200+ stairs, halfway up the cliff, to this church, Church of St. Giorgio

We stayed at Nacalino Agriturismo for 3 nights, our longest stay in Sicily. We knew there wouldn’t be much open on New Year’s Day and we’d been tired, so we happily took a day to rest and stay around our room and the estate. We took walks, we read, played games, watched TV, and Sophie and I did a little photo shoot. Here’s one photo but you can see a carousel of 7 in my Instagram links below this post:

We were sad to leave the agriturismo, we so enjoyed our stay, but it was time to move on east to Siracusa, which I’ll outline in Part 3.

Happy New Year 2020 to all!

Sicily, an enchanting island (Part 1)

While living abroad in the UK, we are currently choosing our travel locales based on some pretty basic criterion: cheap and direct flights from Bristol; southern and warmer during winter months; and northern and cooler in the summer months.

So, that’s how we came up with the idea of exploring the island of Sicily over the Christmas break. There are about 2 or 3 cheap flights a week from Bristol this time or year direct to Catania and once we’re on the island, because it’s the off-season, hotels/AirBnBs are pretty cheap (but it’s still warm to our thick Canadian hides).

We planned out an 11-day tour of the island. We got an inexpensive car rental and are able to get ourselves from town to town (going anticlockwise around the island).

After celebrating an early Christmas at home, we flew out on 24 December. We got in to Catania around 7pm. Sophie was under the weather (having woke up with a fever that morning, we even contemplated cancelling altogether!), so we just decided to get to the hotel, order dinner off the snack bar menu (which included sandwiches, pizzas, and pastas) and get to bed early.

After an early night to bed, we were able to get up, medicate, and go, and start to see Catania in the daylight. We viewed all the churches from the outside but there were so many masses going on we didn’t go in them. The Sicilians are very Catholic and mass was being held hourly all day. The churches were packed. The one time we did manage to peek in, we even saw a line-up for the confession booths!

It was a beautiful 19°C out so we were walking around in T-shirts. This immediately branded us as tourists because all the locals were in winter coats and/or huge, heavy sweaters. However, we were fine with this in order to enjoy the sunshine and weather. We also figured the sun and air couldn’t hurt Sophie’s cough.

We went to a Roman amphitheatre right in the middle of the city. It was originally built by the Greeks then when the Romans took over they continued to build it up. However, as the current, modern city was built up, they built houses right over it. It was only in 2006 that they started excavating the ruins.

You can see apartment buildings built right into the edge of the ruins.

This was how we spent our Christmas Day in Catania. We ate amazing food; we walked around the city seeing the piazzas, churches, and lights; and we toured ancient ruins.

On 26 December, we checked out of our hotel in Catania to make the drive to Taormina. The car we rented is a manual transmission and though Eric knows how to drive one, it’s been 10 years or so. He’d been doing okay on the relatively flat streets of Catania the couple times he drove. But now we had to go to a cliffside mountain town. This was what Eric was dreading more than any other driving on this trip.

However, the roads are in excellent condition, and we made it in one piece! He did great and never stalled out on a hill. We got to the parking lot in Taormina and happily left the car for 2 days. (You don’t drive your car into Taormina, you park and a free shuttle takes you into town).

We had originally booked an AirBnB for Taormina but it was cancelled by the owner a week ago due to ‘family emergency’. Luckily, it’s the off season and Taormina has hundreds of places to stay so we booked another hotel. While this new hotel meant we had to all share one room, we ended up quite thrilled with the location, right in the heart of Taormina’s main pedestrian street with a balcony view of the Mediterranean.

From our balcony patio

We dropped off our things, threw the insulin in the mini fridge, and immediately went back out on the street. We couldn’t wait to explore this beautiful town.

My sunglasses broke as soon as I got to Sicily, and Sophie didn’t bring any. So we found a street vendor to buy some from in Taormina.
In the narrowest street

We didn’t do anything specific except eat good food and walk around the town enjoying the sights and people-watching.

We had the whole day to explore Taormina the next day. We woke up early and headed to the ancient amphitheatre. It was originally built by the Greeks in the 3rd century but like the last one, taken over by the Romans when they took Sicily.

It was just huge, and we could walk around and in it. It also had great views of Mt. Etna.

We also did a lot more walking around and exploring this beautiful town.

Orange trees everywhere!


We took the gondola down the mountain to the water


Eric and I dipped our toes in. Sophie didn’t want to get her feet dirty… *Eyeroll*….
The waterside part of the town was completely dead and we were so glad our AirBnB cancelled on us and we ended up in a hotel on the main strip!

Taormina was just about the prettiest town I’ve ever seen. The restaurants were all wonderful, the people were friendly, and we couldn’t get enough of the views. The prices of things like food and souvenirs were more expensive than in Catania, but we could see why, in this tourist town.

That’s all for now. Next we are heading to Palermo and then an agriturismo (farm-stay B&B) near Modica in the countryside.

Ciao, bellas!

Travelling with our diabetic child

Updated February 2020

Well November is coming to a close, so in honour of World Diabetes Month, I thought I would make a diabetes awareness post.

I know that after Sophie was diagnosed, I spent a lot of time on the internet, searching everything – including how to travel with her. I found it best to read personal accounts from people who have done it – not just generic lists or tips off websites like Diabetes UK or JDRF Canada. I mean, those were helpful, but not exactly what I needed. I needed to hear from someone who had made mistakes and figured out best practices by actually doing it.

So I’m here to share our tips and tricks, so far. We’ve only done a handful of trips; some big, some small, but we learn a little something each time.

Pack extra, and then a little extra more

You may think it’s ridiculous, especially when you’re only going away for one night, or a week-end, and you see the enormous amount of supplies in front of you, but just pack them all.
Our rule of thumb is pack 3 times what you plan on needing. If you plan on needing one pump site change and 200 units of insulin for it – you bring 3 pump sites and 600 units of insulin. See? sounds ridiculous.
There’s a few reasons for this.


One: Because you need to split up your supplies into 2 bags. Never carry all of your supplies in one bag – what if it’s lost? or compromised? Then you’ll have at least what you need and a little extra in a second bag.

Two: Life happens– duh. A pump site fails. Or heat ruins some insulin. An insulin vial breaks. A CGM sensor falls off while swimming….

Three: Your child (or you, whoever the T1D is) cannot LIVE without those supplies, why the heck would you scrimp on them? “Oh I want to bring an extra dress so I think less insulin pump supplies this time…” If these are your priorities, give yourself a shake!

And yep- most trips, you’ll find yourself bringing home 85% of the supplies you packed- cool! I just take out the insulin and keep the bags ready to go for the next trip. But every now and then, you’ll be damn glad you have it all there.

True story- when we went to London for just one night, we brought one suitcase between the 3 of us and the regular huge amount of diabetes supplies. We knew Sophie would be due for a pump change that night, so we had 3 pumps with us. I put 2 in the suitcase and 1 in Sophie’s bag that she wears on her at all times. Well, it was incredibly hot that day. So hot that the Yeoman Warders at the Tower of London had to cut their tours short (because they wear very thick, wool uniforms). The pump kits note on their packaging to remain below 30°C and we knew that the pump in her bag was probably boiling in the sun at around 40°C. I wasn’t sure that pump would be good anymore. (It has a battery inside with radio frequency receivers so that’s the part that could mess up). So we were down to 2 good pumps. Then that evening when we went to change her pump with one of the good ones in our suitcase, we filled it full of insulin and set it to prime— and it didn’t prime– Faulty pump set! We then grabbed the third and last one we had, filled it, and held our breath. It worked. In fact, we held our breath until we got home almost 24 hours later. (We kept the one that had been in her backpack but got too hot, we’d use it if we had to).
Everything worked out in the end – but only because I packed 3x what we needed.
Because of that night, when my husband sees the immense amount of kit I pack for our trips, he doesn’t bat an eye. He takes a shirt out of his suitcase to make room. Sometimes he even suggests we need more.

Security

Anyone who has travelled in the past 18 or so years knows that airport security can be a real nightmare- for all of us.
So how do we deal with so much security, a growing line-up behind us, and the huge bagfuls of needles, devices, liquids, and contraptions (above) that can’t go through the x-ray machine?
Oy.
(Tip: Early in your planning stages, contact your device(s) manufacturers and find out what can and can’t go through the x-ray machines. For example, Dexcom recommends its sensors not go through x-ray. Omnipod says their pods and PDM can, but we prefer to just keep the stuff all together and not risk it – sometimes each bag has ~$1000 worth of medical supplies in it, so lets just have those inspected by hand….)

In England, you can get these sunflower lanyards. They identify an invisible illness. How fantastic!!! These can be acquired by going to the service/help desk in any English airport and telling them why you need it.
We got one for Sophie. We also got one for me but I don’t need it as my illness isn’t invisible in an airport- they see me walking with a cane and are usually quite helpful.
However, only British airports recognise these lanyards right now. We hope that one day, this catches on worldwide.

Anyway, with this lanyard, we can take the handicap line through security (again, we would anyway because of me and my cane, but I’m assuming that most people reading this don’t also have someone in the family with MS… though that correlation is a topic for another day).

When we get to the line, we are prepared and we need to be brisk. We quickly self-identify to the nice folks running the x-rays and security lines that we have some medical devices that cannot go through the scanner and need to be hand-inspected. We always have a doctor’s note to prove this, though they hardly ask for it. (We’ve been asked for a note once when we were moving to the UK and had 6 months’ worth of supplies in our carry-on that all needed to be inspected by hand; then we were asked again at the Madrid airport where I was worried that the letter was in English, but he asked to see her passport to correlate the name on the letter, and then let us through to have hand inspection).

The diabetes bags are always packed on the TOP of our hand luggage so we can grab them quickly and pass them to the security officer. Then Eric and I split up. I realise this is easy to do as we are 2 parents with 1 child. One of us always keeps an eye on the diabetes bags (a: to not lose them, b: to make sure they don’t get sent through the x-ray machine, and c: to answer any questions to the security officers about what is in them) and one of us keeps an eye on our daughter. She’s 11, she can handle walking through the metal detector by herself, but because of the devices she wears, she often sets it off, and they have to pat her down, or swab the devices, which they’re not allowed to do without a parent present.

When we’re in a foreign country and we don’t speak the language at all, it’s a whole new ballgame. We are trying to make sure to look up the words for insulin, diabetes, medicine, ‘no x-ray’ and ‘medical device’ in the language before we go. I then make sure that these are on or in the clear diabetes bags so that they can be seen.

This has proven very important to do in the countries where we don’t speak any of the language (Italy, Spain), as the airport security agents aren’t part of the tourism industry and you can’t expect them to speak any English. In both Italy and Spain, we had to point to these notes to get our point across. (In France, Eric is bilingual in French so we were okay). Each time, it was these little words on the notes that saved our supplies.

Bottom line – be prepared. Have the diabetes bags separate, easy to grab, and a doctor’s note from the clinic (I have yet to encounter a clinic that won’t provide this). If you don’t feel at all confident in the language, have a few important words pre-translated and written out to help you through.

Lows

As you know, hypoglycaemic events (low blood sugars) will happen. Every type 1 diabetic is always on the lookout for them and if they are hypo-unaware, then hopefully they have a continuous glucose monitor or a diabetic alert dog to alert them of falling glucose levels.
However you monitor your child’s low glucose, the main thing is to then feed them glucose to get it back up to a healthier level. We all have our tried-and-true ways of doing this while at home, but when travelling it can be very different.
Something to know before you leave home is how to read nutrition labels in the location(s) you are travelling to, because they’re different everywhere. Know the word for carbohydrates in the language of the country you’re visiting. Sometimes this is obvious- and sometimes you may be visiting a country with a very different language and maybe even with a different alphabet – so knowing what their nutrition label looks like and what word is carbohydrates could be super important!

Photo of my daughter going low in the middle of touring the Pablo Picasso museum in Barcelona… Stuck in a corner downing dextrose tabs because you ‘can’t eat’ in a museum and I thought dextrose tabs were more appropriate for me to say she’s taking medicine….


Sugar can be found anywhere in the world, so it’s not an immediate worry – you will find something to treat lows. But if your child is picky, or you like to be very specific about how many grams of sugar they get for the low, it’s best to come prepared. Don’t assume you’ll find what you want, or even a close substitute in another country.
But no matter what, always, always, make sure you have some on you. If you’re travelling and walking around all day, there may be some unexpected lows, even a lot of them. Having to try and find a store in an unfamiliar area and buy candy/juice/pop in unfamiliar packaging in an unfamiliar language with unfamiliar currency is just not a stress you need at the moment of a low.


Time Zones

This is another aspect of travelling that no one likes, but I never thought of as anything more than an annoyance until we were travelling with a diabetic.
You know how you often have different insulin-to-carb ratios for different times of the day? Or different basal rates throughout the day programmed into your pump? Well, when you just jump 3, 5, or 8 hours and your body has NO idea what time it is; if it just ate breakfast, lunch, or dinner, then you have no idea how much insulin to give it!

Before we moved here and put Sophie’s body through an 8-hour time change, we researched different methods that some diabetics used. Some changed their pump an hour a day. Some stayed on origin’s time for a few days. There were a bunch of options. We went for the rip-off-the-band-aid approach and did it all at once.

When you rip off the band-aid and change the time all at once like we did, be ready for a solid 24-48 hours of wonky blood sugars. But we stuck with it, made her eat on schedule, and they started to make sense again by the second day.

Everyone will have to come up with a plan that’s right for you or your child regarding time changes – it may have to be by trial and error. Start with what you’re most comfortable with and see how it goes.

Eric changing the time in Sophie’s pump by 8 hours as we landed in England.


Those are some of our bigger talking points. Keep in mind, we’re still learning, still experimenting! Below are some more quick tips we’ve picked up along the way:

-Call your airline ahead of time, they can grant you extra hand baggage which can be invaluable when travelling on a budget airline that restricts everyone to one small bag each! If you’re travelling with a companion, you don’t have to pay to select seats together, you can just call ahead and request they are seated next to you as a medical companion. I have yet to encounter an airline that won’t do this.

-Watch the temperatures of your bags. Certainly, keep the insulin in a cooler pack like a Frio wallet, but just as I explained above with our London day-trip, certain supplies shouldn’t get too hot or cold too. These are usually labelled on the packaging. And no, you don’t have to be ridiculously strict about this, but you also don’t want to let your black suitcase sit in the hot sun on a 30°+C day while you sit on the beach and let it bake your supplies.

-If you’re on a longer flight that provides drinks and meals, don’t request the diabetic meal! They’re gross, and a type 1 doesn’t need it, you just have to guess the carb count.
As for drinks, I have yet to encounter a comfort drink trolley that offers anything other than Diet Coke (or Pepsi) as a sugar-free option. If your child wants to drink something other than water or caffeinated cola that they don’t need insulin for, plan ahead and buy some diet pop in the airport (once you’re through security).

-If your child uses a phone for their Dexcom or any diabetes management, know that you do have to put the phone into airplane mode. Airplane mode will first turn off the transmitting function of Dexcom. However, you don’t have to give in and live on fingerpokes. You can go into the phone’s settings and while in airplane mode, manually turn on Bluetooth. If Bluetooth is on, Dexcom will transmit to the phone and alarm, if needed. However, it will not send the data to any followers.

-Don’t forget to pack back-up needles/pens! (So this includes long-acting insulin!) We all know the pump can die completely. Or she could drop it in a toilet! We have to be prepared to always give insulin- always.

I know it all sounds like a lot of check-lists, warnings, and planning, and it is – but we also believe that the opportunities that travel gives our daughter are well worth it. Even though she’s diabetic? Especially because she’s diabetic. Because she needs to see that she has no boundaries in this world, she can do anything, go anywhere – it just takes a little forethought.

Please feel free to comment and leave any tips or tricks on travelling as as diabetic/with a diabetic child. We all need to share the info we learn along the way!

Day trip to London

We had to go to Ruislip (just north of London) where the Canadian military detachment is for Eric’s in-clearance (yes, they said he had to bring the whole family!) so we decided to make a trip of it and go to London for the day!

Unfortunately, it turned out to be a record-breaking hot day (33.5°C) and we were just melting!

Taken at 7am waiting for the train to London while we were still fresh-faced!

What to do with only 1 day in London? Well Sophie’s never been, Eric has lived here for a few months, and I’ve visited for days here and there. We know we’re going to be back a lot in the next 3 years and have a lot of opportunity to see everything we want and it didn’t need to be done all at once. So we decided to give Sophie a tour so she could get her bearings and see and decide just what it was that she wanted to be doing in those future visits, help her build her bucket list.

Sophie enjoyed the view

We took one of the Hop-on, hop-off bus tours. I always find these a good value in a big, new, city where I’m looking to hit all the tourist hot spots in a day or two (you can usually buy 1- or 2-day passes for these tours). We look for a tour that has a lot of buses (that run frequently), that have more buses with live commentary rather than just recordings (it’s always more fun to hear anecdotes from someone who’s been living there their whole life), and tours that have more than one line (the one we chose had 4 lines that criss-crossed the city plus a river boat we could use that we just never had the chance to). We also picked our company based on who went close to our hotel. Then we pre-paid for our tickets online. This saved us money, but also a lot of time when we wanted to join the tour.

We spent the first little bit touring around. We had a great guide who was informative, funny, and personable. I’m not one of those people to take many photos from a moving bus, but here:

Big Ben (and its tower) are encased in scaffolding for the next few years…. It sort of ruins the skyline of London, but it’s what you gotta deal with in order to preserve these things….
Going across Tower Bridge

We took the bus to the Tower of London and hopped off. We also pre-purchased tickets to the Tower so that we could save a few pounds but also avoid the lines.

Just when we got to the Tower. A lady asked Eric to take their family’s photo and he obliged. Then she insisted she take ours because “this lighting is terrific!”. She was right.

It was starting to get hot by now. The sun was baking. We had dropped our suitcases off at the hotel and they put our main insulin supply in the fridge for us, but Sophie’s small diabetic backpack had a spare vial of insulin in it as well. We don’t have a Frio case at all or any sort of cooler, as we haven’t got around to getting one yet. If you’re soon about to use the insulin, it can stay at room temperature up to 30 days. But insulin can never be frozen and never go over 30°C or it will be denatured. Well, in the direct sunlight, it was well over 30°…. We tried a while to always hold the bag in the shade, looking a little ridiculous as we moved about, but in the end we had to admit that there’s no way we can test if that insulin is still good, apart from a few bolus injections and Sophie won’t allow that. We can’t risk filling a 3-day pump with bad insulin and then having to discard the whole pump once we realise it’s not working.

So anyway, we got to the Tower and it was hot. And then we saw the poor Yeoman Warder…

He deserved a medal for this…

He said in the beginning that he didn’t want to hear us complain about the heat, and he was right. When the weather is bad (rain, etc) they shorten the tours from 1hr to 1/2-hr and he did for us too. They just couldn’t have everyone standing around in the heat that long, guests included.

But it was a lovely tour and we learned a lot about the Tower of London. Sophie and Eric went in and up the Tower itself. We saw the jewels, we walked the ramparts, and we had lunch! As we were leaving, another family came to say hi, just because they’d seen Sophie’s Dexcom and were a fellow T1 family. They had a little boy on the Dexcom and Omnipod and they said they just had to say hi to another T1 family on holiday! I think it’s so nice when someone does that and I do it myself, but Sophie’s still shy about it. Yet, she is upset if we don’t, though. (Tweens, amiright?)

Tower bridge from the ramparts

After our time at the Tower, we hopped back on to a bus and decided to head towards King’s Cross station. This was a surprise for Sophie. Her 11th birthday is in a week and a half and well, we really didn’t know what to get her. So since she is a massive Harry Potter fan, we said we’d take her to platform 9-3/4. I, personally, am not a fan, so it was all Greek to me, but seeing her so excited made me very happy too. She got her photo taken and then we took her to the store there and we said, pick out what you want, we’ll get it for your birthday! Her face was priceless.

The professional photo we bought

Sophie bought that Ravenclaw scarf (100% Scottish lambswool made by the same company who made the original scarves worn in the movies) and a Ravenclaw hairbow. She’s a happy girl.

By then we were getting tired so we hopped on the bus yet again and just let it tour us back to our hotel. We got to see more of London and then crash in our air-conditioned room. (And I mean crash).

Me, in front of a London city-scape, looking hot, tired, and deshevelled.

We went back out again in a bit for an Italian dinner then back to our room. Sophie was due for a pump change – here is where I’m so glad for our ‘bring 3x what we need’ rule. We tried to start up the pump and it didn’t activate properly!!! So we opened a second pump and tried it and held our breath and thankfully all was well. We would have had just enough insulin and one more pod to do it a third time, but barely (with the vial of insulin we now have to throw out due to heat!).

Anyway, pump change in a hotel again but we’re old hat at it now and it eventually went well. We have already ordered a Frio wallet to be delivered later this week for all our future travels to protect our precious insulin!!!

That’s it! That’s our day in London. We had to call it a night and hit the hay so we could be up early to leave for Ruislip at 7am. We were in offices all day long there but felt thoroughly welcomed by everyone at the Canadian detachment and know they genuinely want to help us acclimate and settle in to our home here in England.

London is a beautiful city and we can’t wait to come back on many day and weekend trips over the next few years!

Taken from inside the Tower of London

We’re officially expats!

Well we’re here! We’ve made it! We got through immigration without an issue and now we’re officially expats- Canadians living in the UK for the next 3 years!

Our flights were pretty good, the only hiccup being delays in Victoria, about 2.5 hours. Luckily, we originally planned for a long layover in Vancouver so we had time to spare. Turns out we ended up with only an hour or so in Vancouver and because it’s such a large airport, by the time we got to our gate, they were just starting boarding. Perfect!

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Looking fresh at the beginning of our long flight!

The flight from Vancouver to London is about 9 hours and is an 8-hour time difference – so no matter what, it leaves you messed up. There’s not much you can do to prepare for that and it takes time to get over that.

Wine helps.

This was the longest flight Sophie has ever taken and the furthest she’s ever travelled to date in one-go, so she had endorphins and excitement to keep her going. She’s never been on an intercontinental flight, so she’s never got to experience a real airplane meal (not including the fairly nice ones you can buy on Air Canada domestic flights).

Air plane dinner

We knew that dinner would be served right before we needed to try and sleep, and the only sugar-free drink options for her would be water or caffeinated diet Coke, so we picked up a sugar-free drink in the airport before we boarded (she had the choice of iced tea or diet Sprite). Thinking ahead is usually how to I try to avoid diabetic upset!!
But then dinner came and how to guess how many carbs in this meal? Pasta, a bun, a brownie, and a corn and edamame salad? We just completely guessed. We didn’t guess enough, and had to do a correction later on. We figured it was better to be conservative on that side than to risk lows on the airplane.

Then it came time to land!

Eric showing Sophie the landmarks of London as we fly over
Sophie couldn’t take her eyes off London below us as we descended

And as you know when you approach a new city with new time zone as you land, the pilot lets you know the local time and everyone adjusts their watch (okay, not as much anymore because everyone has cell phones…). We took this time to pull out Sophie’s insulin pump control and adjust the time settings in that.
The timings in an insulin pump are very specific to each individual for every hour in the day. As I’ve explained in the past, she gets a constant drip of insulin throughout the day, as well as doses with each thing she eats. This constant drip dose throughout the day changes up and down based on her body’s insulin needs (as we’ve determined them, with the help of nurses and glucose monitoring). Same with her meal doses- She gets a different dose of insulin with breakfast carbs than she dose at lunch or dinner. This is all because of a lot of trial and error and countless dose adjustment and changes we’ve made over the past 6-9 months. We are always watching her glucose levels and determining her insulin needs and adjusting her insulin pump settings and daily timings, if necessary.

So, we were very nervous about making a drastic 8-hour time change to her insulin pump. We did a lot of reading about how best to do this – we read about changing it an hour a day, eating meals on the origin’s time for a few days, etc. But we found most of these suggestions lent themselves best to the idea of only a 2-4-hour time-change, not a huge 8-hour time-difference.

In the end, we decided to go for the rip-off-the-bandage approach and just change the time in the pump and deal with some wonky blood glucoses for a few days as we all try to get used to the time.

Pushing through!!! Changing those time settings!

We definitely noticed wonky BGs for the first 24 hours, her body didn’t know if it was breakfast or nighttime or what…. but we’re approaching the 48-hour mark and the BGs are already starting to make more sense (as much sense as T1D can ever make in a pubescent girl!)

So now here we are in Bristol!! We pushed through our jet-lag and had a busy first full day, picking up our rental car, picking up the keys to our new house, visiting our new house, and registering at the local doctor’s office. Sophie loves our new ‘local’ (the closest pub to our house) where we went for lunch and we do too.

Sophie can’t take her eyes off the windows while driving around, there’s so much to take in!

We topped off the day by celebrating Sophie’s first diaversary! Yes, one year ago, on 13 August 2018, she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. And now here we are! She got to choose dinner (fish & chips with mushy peas) and pick out English chocolate for dessert. It wasn’t a big huge celebration, but we are in a new country and getting to do an awful lot of awesome fun things!

Sophie is enjoying her diaversary chocolate

We still have so much to do- meet the doctor, get referral to the Diabetes Clinic, buy stuff for the house, go get school uniforms for Sophie, set up our mobiles…. the list seems endless.
We’ve received word that our furniture and effects have arrived in England and we’re currently trying to arrange a date for delivery and unpacking- they don’t seem to be in a super hurry to get to us!

So there’s still so much to do to officially make this our home, but we will and we are! The adventure has only begun!