A long weekend in Cornwall

Well my dad came all the way to England from Canada to visit us! He’s done almost half a dozen invasive Covid tests, he quarantined, and then we were finally able to start showing him our new and current home! We’ve been doing lots of little day trips around the area and then we planned a big longer trip down to the very southern tip of Cornwall for the bank holiday weekend for some fun in the sun and family time. I could write a whole blog post about each individual thing we did in Cornwall, but I’ll try and just touch on what we did and put it all in one as an example of what can be done as a fun multi-generational long-weekend in Cornwall!

The first stop we made on the way to our destination in Cornwall was a place I’ve been wanting to see since we got here in 2019, Tintagel Castle. Tintagel has an association with the legends of King Arthur and is believed to be where his famous Knights of the Round Table were. When the castle was originally built in the 14th century, there was a natural stone bridge linking the two sides of the castle, but it fell into the sea about 500-600 years ago. No human had crossed at that point again until 2019 when they rebuilt this beautiful cantilever (meaning a suspension bridge that does not meet at ALL in the middle!) bridge where the original bridge once was.

It. was. terrifying.

Please take 10 minutes and watch this video by English Heritage about how the bridge was made. The floor of the bridge is made out of sheets of slate from a nearby quarry but they’re put in this way, so they don’t become a skating rink when wet:

That all seems well and fine until they shift 1cm under your foot when you take a step and you feel like the entire bridge it about the fall out underneath you. OMG!

But the views, the views from every which angle, were spectacular-

After a beautiful afternoon in the sun with the sea air, we went on further south to our rental house for the evening. We specifically chose a place that could make 3 different generations happy and had a beautiful view of the sea and a hot tub too!

On day 2, we decided to head towards, and past, Penzance. We learned that the roads get incredibly narrow and tight this far south in Cornwall. Usually only room for one car at a time but yet they are considered 2-way roads, so you’re constantly watching for oncoming traffic, and needing to deek into the nonexistent shoulder, or if you’re very lucky, a small lay-by, while you pass each other. The British drivers seemed to have no trouble with this. This was normal for them. The Canadians who are more used to having large roads with large shoulders and more space in our country than we know what to do with, were a little more nervous!

Once we got to each location we found, though- it was so worth it! First off, we came to a beach in Porthcurno.

The water was cold, but the beach was sandy and the sun was warm. We didn’t have our beach clothes or anything for a beach day (not even towels), we were just there for the views!

Next, we as we were driving along the nail-biting roads, I notice a circle of stones in the field next to us. Obviously, other people knew about it because there was a very small car park there so Eric pulled over quickly and we got out to investigate. We quickly looked at Google Maps and learned that they were the Merry Maidens stone circle, circa 2500-1500BC. We were the only ones there and it was so neat to just stumble upon ancient history and walk amongst it.

After that more calm and idle stop, we needed to drive into Mousehole. Oh, Mousehole….

Mousehole was a tiny little idyllic fishing village that had about one bike lane in and one bike lane out. Really. Yet those bike lanes are being used by vehicles both large and small in both directions. Really. One vehicle can barely fit in some of those roads but they were okay with making them 2-way roads? We totally got caught – on a hill – with oncoming traffic and no where to go. Rock wall on one side, building on another. Took about 20 mins and a lot of stress, but Eric managed us out of it. No scratches on the car, either! Beer at lunch was well-deserved!


After Mousehole and the hours of intense driving, we decided to take it easy and go ‘home’ for the day.

On day 3, we had big plans and got up bright and early to head to St. Michael’s Mount.

This was only about a 10-minute drive from where we were staying so it wasn’t that hard to get to in the morning. Sometimes you can walk right to the island over an underwater causeway if the tide is way out (thus, it wouldn’t be underwater), but we very purposely looked up the tide schedule because we wanted to take a boat over. It’s about 1 km to the island and we knew we’d have to save all my legs’ energy to get UP that mountain and not waste it in the walk TO the mountain.
So luckily, the tide was in at 10am (when I have fresh ‘morning legs’ anyway) and we happily spent the £2 each to take the boat over to the mountain. The climb up to the castle was pretty steep and hard in some parts, literally scrambling over stones and boulders – not just a walk up stairs. Once we got up to the castle, they spoke of how many royals had visited, including The Queen in 2013, and my only thought was – how??? How the heck did The Queen, at about 85, get up there? Holy Heck! Queen Victoria and Charles and Camilla have also visited. How?

Anyway, we really had a grand time. It was absolutely beautiful. The views, the interior, the history. If you’re ever in Cornwall, this should not be missed!! (And it turned out to be quite fortuitous that we went early, because it was getting *SO* busy by the time we left at noon). I can’t imagine how swamped it would be by the time everyone could walk across.


On our last day, we checked out of our rental caravan early and decided to stop at Falmouth for breakfast. It was a bank holiday and the streets were quiet. Most businesses were closed but it was a pretty little town to walk through.


After breakfast in Falmouth, we were off to our booked entry slot at the Eden Project. If you’ve never heard of the Eden Project (the world’s biggest greenhouse), please click on the link and learn about it! It was really, really amazing. It’s a conservationist project in an old quarry in Cornwall where they grow and cultivate species of plants from all over, in the hopes of teaching and guiding new generations about the importance of our one earth and everything that it provides.

And it sure was beautiful.

Inside the rainforest biome

Incidentally, I will give a HUGE shout-out to Eden’s accessibility team because we’ve been to a lot of museums and castles and places where we know they have wheelchairs for use on site and we ask for them, and we have seen the entire spectrum of helpful staff from nice people to staff who almost needed a picture of a wheelchair drawn for them and then needed to call their manager and find out where they were stored… yes, really. At Eden, we were so helpfully lead to the Blue Badge (handicapped) parking by the attendants, and then surprised to find manual wheelchairs parking in dry bays right at the handicapped parking lot. Convenient! Then when we got inside, because I had read on their website that they had a few motorised wheelchairs available (which I’ve never seen at any museum before!!!), I just asked at the front desk and was lucky enough to snag the last one! They kindly showed me how to use it, it had been fully cleaned and charged and was ready to go. As far as accessible museum visits go, this one got 5+ stars!! I would have never, ever been able to walk all around the whole site, as far as we did, and this way I was fully able to enjoy our visit with some independence.



After our beautiful visit to the Eden Project, it was time to hit the road home. We had a fabulous few days in Cornwall, we couldn’t have ordered more perfect weather, nothing but blue skies and warm days. We got to see some really fantastic sights, neat history, beautiful architecture, and do things we’d never get the opportunity to do elsewhere. We also made some fantastic memories with important, much-needed family time.

Our Narrowboat Adventure

Well we all know that travel in 2021 is nothing that we dreamed of back in 2019; however, we are trying to make the best of a very weird situation while we live in the UK. Back in March, we assumed that we wouldn’t easily be able to travel to the continent this summer; and if we would, we couldn’t predict which countries would be open corridors for travel. So we decided to hedge our bets and put money down on a narrowboat rental in Cheshire! We thought this would be an excellent Covid-safe, family-friendly holiday for a week in July.

England and Wales are criss-crossed with about 2600 navigable miles of interconnected canals (4700 miles total) that date back to the days of the Industrial Revolution. They were created to transport raw materials to the place of manufacture and then finished product to the consumer. Narrowboats that hauled goods and materials were originally powered by animals and towed alongside the canals on the paths that still exist beside the canals today (creatively still called ‘the tow path’).
Narrowboats have about a max speed of 4mph, or a brisk walk. You have to reduce that speed by at least half every time you’re passing a moored boat or going through a narrow area/under a narrow bridge. There were plenty of times people passed us while walking on the tow path.

It isn’t a cheap holiday, we fully admit that. We used ABC Boat Hires and started at Anderton Marina. I don’t normally comment on our holidays’ costs; but if you’re like me, you’d first think that this would be an economical vacation because it’s sort of self-catering like an AirBnB. It’s not. You can stay in a nice hotel for the week for the same price. (But then I guess you’d have to pay for 3 restaurants a day, and this way we were making our own food).

You also have to put in a LOT of sweat equity! The entire week, the boat is run only by you! When you pick up the boat, they give you a quick lesson, but you’re out on the canals on your own within the hour. Your boat party has to be the navigators, engineers, boatswains (rope handlers), and captain of the boat. You also have to be prepared to completely run the locks that you’ll have to navigate!
So what I originally imagined as a relaxing, beautiful holiday sipping vino on the boat deck in the sun as I read a book turned out very different!


Luckily, we only had to actually travel and work for a few hours (3-6) a day. The amount of work that this travel entailed each time/hour varied.
While actually sailing along, Eric did all the steering. This meant he was ‘working’ constantly and couldn’t take a break, but was sitting and often quite relaxed during this time (and often quite very stressed, when space was tight and canals were busy!). During the sailing, I did things like go out front and ‘spot’ on tight turns looking for other boats (since the bow of the boat was 50 feet ahead of the stern where Eric was steering from); get ropes, lines, and fenders in order; or catch my rest to get ready for the next set of locks.

Sometimes we would do up to 10 sets of locks a day. They’re an immense amount of work! Sophie and I did all the above-water lock work and Eric steered into the locks (this was a tricky job for Eric, but also then he got to have a mini break). If there were other boats ahead of us waiting to go up or down the locks, we would go and help them through, as it’s the ‘thing to do’ on the canals (neighbours helping neighbours). So sometimes when we say ‘we did 5 locks today’ it really meant we sent 9 boats through 5 locks, or something close. Constantly cranking the metal gears for the water paddles and moving the heavy wooden lock gates open and closed was a lot of work! But being at the locks as other boats were coming and going was a really great experience, a way to chat to people from all over, people who were new at this like us and people who have been doing this for 30+ years.

I also must mention here how much work Sophie did and how helpful she was. Not only with working all the locks, but every single time we needed to come alongside, she was the first one to jump off the moving boat on to land and grab a rope to pull us in. I could have never done that (I tried, once, and literally landed on my face) and Eric was steering. She was an integral part of our crew that we couldn’t have done without.

We also had to do one day of lift bridges, which was neat – Sophie did the hand-crank lift-bridge and I did the electric lift-bridge with a button that stopped traffic in 3 ways. Hers, like the locks, required so much muscle! And mine was cool cause it gave me a huge power trip stopping traffic.

The interior of our narrowboat was certainly a tight fit but more than comfortable for the 3 of us for a week. Imagine an RV or trailer, as it is set up very similar. The kitchen is small but full – 4 burner hob, small oven, and small grill; dual sink; microwave; and all pans, dishes, and cutlery. There is a private bedroom at the rear and forward, the dining table can drop into a comfortable bed. There is also a full bathroom with shower. The toilet/black water tank is designed to take about a weeks’ worth of waste before needing pumped and indeed, it was just indicating needing pumping the very morning we were returning the boat after a week (though we did often follow the Canadian cottage/septic tank rules of ‘if it’s yellow let it mellow’ to save flushes).

https://www.abcboathire.com/our-boats/2-5-berth/alvechurch-wren

I found little-to-no problem cooking in the tiny kitchen, it had everything I needed. In fact, I made some pretty excellent full meals for us there! However, two people definitely did NOT fit and it was even difficult to have a second person pass through the area (say, from the rear of the boat to the front) while I was cooking.

Something to note about narrowboat vacationing- you need to be prepared to ‘go with the flow’ (literally! haha) because life happens, things happen, and plans change.
On our second day, we had an entire plan to go one way and mentioned it to a pair of nice and chatty volunteers who were manning one set of locks- we were hoping to get to Chester. He immediately said ‘No you won’t’ and we learned that two days earlier, a newbie on a boat had broken one of the main lock gates on the way to Chester. There was absolutely no way for us to get there. Well, it was definitely a let-down at the moment, but we quickly regrouped and where we would have turned right, we turned left! Oh well! What can you do?!?! We decided to just be glad that we ran into those men who told us about the broken locks before we wasted two days getting there only to be turned around.

Aside from the work and toil involved, the boating lifestyle was great fun! Whenever we’d decided that we had travelled far enough, we could just pull over and moor. There are ‘public mooring’ sites indicated on the maps where there are metal rings to tie alongside with and are easier sites; but if you’re not at one of those sites, you just use the giant metal pegs (like tent pegs on steroids) that can be hammered into the ground alongside and make your own mooring site anywhere! We would moor every day for an hour or so for lunch and then again every day we’d quit for the day by 3-4pm. Eric’s favourite was when we moored alongside or near a pub. There were many pubs right next to the canal with mooring sites for boats. We could moor and go pop in for a pint! (Well, because we’re Canadian, a whole meal).

Once moored for the day, I got to live out my narrowboat dreams of sitting with a book and my wine and, quite honestly, usually having the Olympics on the BBC in the background, if we happened to get a good enough signal where we were! (I’m an Olympics addict and while it’s not Canadian coverage, I sure just love watching good sport!!!). I also adored watching all the swans and ducks visit our boat. The waterfowl simply associate boats with people with food, so they always would come by and see if we had anything. I could stay there and watch them for hours.

Overall, I think we had a really fantastic, busy, hardworking week on our narrowboat. It was such a quintessentially English holiday and one we’ll never forget. It’s may be not what we would have planned as our first choice of a summer vacation in Europe, but was an amazing way to see and discover the UK while we’re here. I’m so glad we did this trip!

Lockdown in the UK

Well it’s been a pause since I’ve last written – we sure haven’t had any travel whatsoever to comment on or share. We, along with the rest of the world, have been staying home, isolating, and trying to keep this pandemic from running wildly out of control. Eric fortunately can work rather well and in the little office ‘cabin’ that we have in our back garden. He goes out there for a few hours every day and doesn’t bother us, and we don’t bother him.

Sophie has been doing school work from home since March without much issue. She does about an hour a day each morning and then is done. They aren’t sending much more than a little maths and English. Then she spends the rest of her day helping me – cooking and cleaning; sitting on her phone or the laptop; and doing a ridiculous amount of gymnastics. In the last few weeks as the weather has got really nice, she’s been going to the park at the end of the street with the twin girls next door. They can all stay socially distanced, but have fun doing gymnast tricks and flips together.

Sophie goes back to school the week of June 8. It’s only her year that is returning to her school (they’re the oldest class in the school) and while we know there is, of course, a risk – we weighed out the risks vs benefits, read the 25-page risk-assessment plan the school wrote, and decided that it would be okay for her to return to see her friends before they finish and leave this school for good. Of course, their big year-6 residential trip (5 days away at a holiday camp in the countryside) was cancelled and the kids are just devastated. She will only be going a total of 10 days before the year is up – – then we’ll see how the secondary school is planning to start things in September.

As part of her life lessons, she learned how to climb a tree (for the very physically awkward kid, this really was a feat!)

Sophie’s BGs have overall been okay. I’ve read about everyone from kids to adult T1Ds having to adjust their insulin doses during lockdown due to different activity level, diet, and stress. Sophie is no different, we’ve certainly had to make changes to her doses; however, I’m not sure we’re making more changes than we usually do (with the amount of growing and hormonal changes she does, her insulin needs are ever-changing). We had her 3-monthly diabetes specialist appointment virtually in May and he was very pleased with the numbers he could see and what we were reporting to him.

I myself have been busy with more domestic jobs than I could have ever imagined I’d fit into this time. We have inherited an extensive flower garden and while I grew up with a green-thumb for a mother, I myself was never interested and never took to it. I also find it very physically difficult with my MS, because it’s so much low-back work (a lot of bending involved!) that I tire of it really quickly. Well, I’ve had nothing but good weather and time to try my hand at it this spring. My mother has been helping me virtually as well as my landlady answering questions via text message (as she’s the one who did all the original planting). I’ve made a lot of mistakes but learned a lot (especially in the rose-department. We have at least 8 small to HUGE, tree-sized rose buses/vines) and hope that I can continue this hobby with less mistakes; thus, optimising the amount of time I can physically put towards it before my body gives out. Anyway, we now have a really beautiful garden oasis to be able to sit in during this endless isolation.

Our back patio
Some of my roses

I’ve also been cooking – a lot. Sophie has been helping me and getting real-life lessons. One great part about being in the UK is we can get all of our groceries delivered – certainly a bit harder since lockdown started, but still manageable. Sophie has been a big help and hands-on: learning how to meal plan (come up with varied and healthy dinners, using up the leftovers and all the ingredients by the proper times, etc), helping form the online order (we’re only allowed to order 80 items so sometimes it’s a matter of buying in bulk, or learning what to go without, or getting things that do double-duty), and then she’s really been helping me a lot in the kitchen making dinners. In fact, most recently, she’s decided she wants to be a vegetarian; so she’s gone to all the work she needs to to find the recipes and learn how to alter them so she can have them without meat but Eric and I still can have it. (We’ll see how long that lasts, but so far it’s been a week and she’s completely happy without meat).
It also helps that grocery prices here haven’t seemed to skyrocket the way I’ve heard they have back in Canada. Groceries here have always been way cheaper than in Canada, but we haven’t noticed any increase in price since all this started. Meat is still stupidly cheap.
We’ve made some wonderful things in the kitchen: cookies of every imaginable variety (which we always share with our 93-year-old neighbour, Peter); bagels; cakes; many tempting roasts- I’ve perfected my roasties (roasted potatoes that the Brits love with their Sunday roasts – crispy on the outside and fluffy on the inside); I make croutons about once a week with the butts of commercial bread (because we love croutons and the store-bought ones are no good here, mine are amazing); thick grilled steak with decadent toppings like mushrooms and caramelised onions or a blue cheese sauce; pretzels (recipe from my niece, Bella!); and Sophie and I even learned how to make pierogies that were to-die-for!



Now, we’re thinking ahead and hoping that the lockdown restrictions continue to lift (slowly, and responsibly) and that by early August, we’ll be able to take a roadtrip up to the Scottish Highlands and have a socially distanced vacation. We’ve booked a few AirBnB places that will ensure we won’t have to be close to anyone and can just enjoy the views of lochs, coos, mountains, and valleys. We also made sure that they had a full cancellation policy in effect until the end of July in case anything pops up and restrictions are set in place again. But, I haven’t left my block in more than 3 months and just having something like this to look forward to now is really helpful.


This whole pandemic has been awful. We really try not to focus on the things we’ve missed out on or lost during this time; the fact that this is supposed to be our golden opportunity to be living in Europe…. because too many people have lost so much more than just a trip. Trips can be rescheduled, and will be. We haven’t lost any money, which makes us so fortunate but most important of all, we haven’t lost any loved ones. That makes us the richest of all.

Now, the world is turning to another issue, the issue of racial injustice. Of course this must come with mass gatherings and protests. I know the time is now and this has to be done. I hope this is being done safely and nobody will pay the price for it later. Please be safe, everyone.





Please make sure to follow my instagram @highsandlowsabroad for more recent photos and content about us! I post there much more often than I do here!

Wells and Cheddar Gorge (and Covid-19)

We decided to go on a wee adventure today; before we’re entirely stuck in the house for who-knows-how-long.

No doubt about it, Covid-19 is going to mess up our spring plans; just how much remains to be seen. We had a busy spring planned ahead of us — a weekend trip to London for the Harry Potter show, a trip to Canada for Easter, a weekend trip to Isle of Wight, grandparents visiting, diabetes camp, the Queen’s Garden Party, a trip to Ireland, and Sophie’s school residential trip the first week of June. We know some of these will be cancelled. Maybe even all of them, if the current predictions and timelines are right. That will suck, but what can you do. We are among billions of people being inconvenienced and it’s no one’s fault that this happened. All we can do is follow precautions, hope, and wait.

That being said, we’re currently in a country that has effectively kept business as usual… Just stay home if you’re sick. Kids are still in school and people still going to work. Yet the Canadian Forces has essentially been told to stand down, if you can. Go home, stay there, and stay healthy. So… There’s a lot of confusion still and a lot left to be seen. However we do know that we’re not allowed to travel/leave the country that we’re currently in (for now, for the next 3 weeks).

So with all the uncertainty and knowing there is a lot more coming (anticipating UK closures in the next few days or week) we decided to get out just one last time- choosing a place that is not crowded, open air, practice social distancing, lots of hand hygiene, and no restaurants (I personally believe restaurants to be one of the biggest vectors for airborne/droplet disease in this world and I won’t go near them right now).

So off to Wells we went. Wells is the smallest city in England.

That moniker comes about because any location with a cathedral is a city and Wells has a truly spectacular cathedral; however, the city is quite small. There are villages around that are larger than Wells, but they don’t have a cathedral so don’t get to call themselves a city. It’s all so specific!

The Wells Cathedral is a stunner. Dating back to the twelfth century, with a large choral wing, Bishop’s palace, and more.

You can see the scissor arch in the middle, that was added afterwards to help support the sinking spire.
The Wells Cathedral clock is an astronomical clock from about 1325.
Cathedral cat hanging out at the heaters. Clearly at home here.

After touring the cathedral, we took a walk around the small, historic city. There was a Saturday market going on, too.

At the Bishop’s palace
Vicar’s Close — claimed to be the oldest purely residential street with original buildings in Europe. Dating to the 14th century.
A sweet market in the Wells town square.

After a toodle around Wells, seeing the cathedral, Bishop’s palace, market, and all, we drove off again. Cheddar Gorge isn’t far so we went there next. We had packed a picnic lunch in order to not have to go to a restaurant and practice social distancing. This also turned out to be super helpful because Sophie started going very low on the drive to Cheddar. It was nice that we were able to eat right away vs. waiting in a restaurant while she is feeling miserable.

Cheddar Gorge is England’s largest gorge. It has caves deep within the rock that they’ve been making cheddar cheese and aging it in for centuries. You can buy tickets to do things like climb stairs up the edge of this gorge, absail down, or tour the caves, but we wanted to do none of those.

We walked the main street of the gorge, popped into a few stores, sampled and purchased some cheddar, and then left.

Cave-aged cheddar. Yum!

And that was our day – our morning, really. Just a little nip out to see some historic and beautiful sites and home by 2pm. No interacting with anybody in the public, kept to our personal bubbles, and hopefully didn’t inadvertently bring Covid-19 home. But if we did, we’re ready to quarantine.

I hope everyone is ready and prepared but more so I hope everyone stays healthy and safe. Please stop the thinking that ‘if you’re healthy and young, it will be okay’ because some of us aren’t healthy and might not be okay through this. Every time you say that, it feels like you invalidate the life of the sick and elderly who are most at risk.

Take care, all. Xx

Ola Barcelona!

I know it’s been a while since I’ve posted, but life has been both boring and hectic at the same time. I took a trip back to Canada to see my folks while Eric and Sophie stayed in Bristol. Then Eric went to Scotland for a work trip… There’s just always something!

But we’re back at it with our family adventures. And sticking with our criteria of ‘go where it’s cheap and easy to fly to’ (and warm in February), we came up with Spain as our next holiday for half-term break.

We decided to fly in to Barcelona, stay a few days, take a train to Madrid, stay a couple more days, then fly home.

So, Barcelona. Wow! First off, the weather in February is fantastic. No, we can’t go swimming or anything, but it’s 18-21°C, sunny, and comfortable. Such a nice break from the cold rain storms hammering the UK lately.

Sophie on our balconette overlooking the pedestrian street in the Gothic Quarter

We got to our hotel and while I won’t normally give hotel reviews here, I will definitely name-drop this one. The Hostel Fernando far exceeded our expectations. Yes, it says it is a hostel, but you can book family rooms. We had a room with a queen bed and two bunk beds, and a private ensuite bathroom. The beds are so comfortable and the pillows were my favourite- memory foam! It is impeccably clean, amazingly located, and such an amazing price. Sure, we’re here in the off season, but paying only CAD 125/night (taxes in) and that includes a breakfast buffet!!

So enough about that. Once we checked into our room, we went out to explore. We walked along the pedestrian street of Las Ramblas, ambled through La Boqueria (the large public market), and made it down to the waterfront (not the beach but the harbour).

La Boqueria
Spices for sale
Ham is the biggest deal in Spain. Right off the leg!
Christopher Columbus at the harbour (the infamous statue pointing in the wrong direction to the new world!)
The Barcelona Harbourfront

Also, it was Eric’s birthday the day we travelled, so we let him choose the restaurants and food. All he wanted a good authentic paella for lunch. Happy birthday honey!

Guy at the next table refused to stop photobombing! Lol!

In the evening after a long siesta, we walked through the gothic quarter, explored the Barcelona cathedral, and then stopped at a tapa bar for dinner.

Barcelona cathedral was one of the more impressive gothic cathedrals I’ve been in in a while (since Paris). However, it does charge an entry fee. Beware that in Spain they are more strict about modest clothing in their religious churches. No tank tops or shorts.

There are tapa bars were you can order off the menu and then the more touristy ones where they have it all made up and you fill your plate with what looks good. This ended up being a great choice for us because when travelling with a kid, she could choose what she wanted to/knew she would eat and then we could also get what we wanted.

Tapas, tapas, tapas!

On our second day in Spain (first full day) we had booked tickets to the big tourist locations- Sagrada Familia (Sacred Family Church) and Park Guell. Both are major Antonio Gaudi architectural gems. First up, Sagrada Familia.

While waiting out front for our tour to start

We decided to splurge the 1€/person extra that it was to get a guided tour (more than an audio tour). I know, big spenders, but sometimes we just gotta go for broke and live a little!

Well the church just blew us away. Eric had visited back in 2012, so wasn’t as surprised and stunned as Sophie and me, but they’re working so hard and fast in order to reach their goal of finishing by 2026 that they’ve even done a lot since he’s last visited. The outside is one strange oddity but then the inside and the stained glass just takes your breath away.

Gaudi loved taking his inspiration from nature, and he built all the columns of the church to look like trees… When you look up, they branch off and it looks like a treetop canopy above you. The stained glass was great, but this was my favourite part.

So we spent most of our morning here at this amazing church. We learned a lot about Gaudi from our knowledgeable and lovely guide, and why he did some things the way he did.

After appreciating his biggest work, we headed to Park Guell, an area on the hill above the city that Gaudi was architect of that was supposed to originally be a housing development and residential area. In the end, only two houses were built, but there is a large park and many beautiful architectural features. The mosaics here are so beautiful. It’s like, it was already outside so he couldn’t make stained glass windows, so he just made beautiful, colourful mosaics that shone and sparkled in the Spanish sunshine.

After Park Guell and lunch we made one more stop before siesta to see another couple Gaudis from the outside. These buildings can cost quite a bit to get into to tour and frankly, we’d had enough. We just can’t do it all in only a couple days, but enjoyed seeing them from the outside.

In the evening, we went to the Museum of Barcelona History, where you take an elevator down below the city and view the excavated ruins of a Roman city! I expected just a few ruins here or there but it was really quite extensive and large!

Also I’ll take this moment to note- a lot of tourist sites in Barcelona offer discounts for disabled people. Some are quite obvious about it and offer the option online when booking, but some you need to ask. This museum had no notation of a disabled ticket on their pricing board but I thought I’d ask. I carry my handicap pass with me in my bag if they want proof further than my cane (I’ve never been asked). They ended up giving me a discount, because I asked. He never would have offered. So don’t be afraid to speak up and ask!

On our last morning in Barcelona, we went to the Pablo Picasso museum. This was another museum that didn’t advertise disabled pricing but I put myself out there to ask and voila, my ticket was free. (Between the history museum the night before and this Picasso museum, I saved us €20!).

When entering the museum, they were rather strict about bags, and you must leave all bags in a locker. Eric and I both had small backpacks and Sophie had her diabetic bumbag. I told them that mine and Sophie’s bags were medical bags and they were fine letting us keep them. My bag carries a lot of extra rescue sugars for her and a glucagon injection kit, too.

Picasso museum was awesome

However, about 15 minutes into the museum, we hear Sophie’s low alarm go off (so loud in the middle of a quite museum!). We had had a breakfast buffet at the hostel and obviously over-guessed the carbs… She had way too much insulin on board. We had her suspend all insulin in her pump and clandestinely eat a roll of candies. But 15 minutes later, she was still low! This lasted over half an hour, giving her candies and granola bars, getting her to fingerpoke to test. Sometimes a sugar treatment just won’t work because she has so much insulin in her from her last bolus that it’s just going through the glucose as we give it to her and we can’t get her up.

Sitting in the corner of the museum eating dextrose tabs.

Fortunately, she eventually got up to 6.2 mmol/L and started feeling better and we could all breathe a lot better too. Of course, we were almost done the museum by then!

So that was our time in Barcelona! After the museum, we grabbed our bags from the hotel and headed for the train station to catch our bullet train (300km/hr) to Madrid. In fact, that’s where I’m writing this right now, on the train, with views of the Spanish countryside whizzing past me.

Spanish countryside halfway between Barcelona and Madrid

The train was actually about £30/person MORE than a flight from Barcelona to Madrid, but this way we can travel right from downtown–>downtown, no need to make the treks to and from airports, and waste half our day sitting in the airport waiting for our flight.

Now, we’re excited to see Madrid for the next two and a half days and I’ll update you afterwards! If you don’t already, go follow me on Instagram (click the photos below for links) for up-to-date photos as we take them!!!