A long weekend in Cornwall

Well my dad came all the way to England from Canada to visit us! He’s done almost half a dozen invasive Covid tests, he quarantined, and then we were finally able to start showing him our new and current home! We’ve been doing lots of little day trips around the area and then we planned a big longer trip down to the very southern tip of Cornwall for the bank holiday weekend for some fun in the sun and family time. I could write a whole blog post about each individual thing we did in Cornwall, but I’ll try and just touch on what we did and put it all in one as an example of what can be done as a fun multi-generational long-weekend in Cornwall!

The first stop we made on the way to our destination in Cornwall was a place I’ve been wanting to see since we got here in 2019, Tintagel Castle. Tintagel has an association with the legends of King Arthur and is believed to be where his famous Knights of the Round Table were. When the castle was originally built in the 14th century, there was a natural stone bridge linking the two sides of the castle, but it fell into the sea about 500-600 years ago. No human had crossed at that point again until 2019 when they rebuilt this beautiful cantilever (meaning a suspension bridge that does not meet at ALL in the middle!) bridge where the original bridge once was.

It. was. terrifying.

Please take 10 minutes and watch this video by English Heritage about how the bridge was made. The floor of the bridge is made out of sheets of slate from a nearby quarry but they’re put in this way, so they don’t become a skating rink when wet:

That all seems well and fine until they shift 1cm under your foot when you take a step and you feel like the entire bridge it about the fall out underneath you. OMG!

But the views, the views from every which angle, were spectacular-

After a beautiful afternoon in the sun with the sea air, we went on further south to our rental house for the evening. We specifically chose a place that could make 3 different generations happy and had a beautiful view of the sea and a hot tub too!

On day 2, we decided to head towards, and past, Penzance. We learned that the roads get incredibly narrow and tight this far south in Cornwall. Usually only room for one car at a time but yet they are considered 2-way roads, so you’re constantly watching for oncoming traffic, and needing to deek into the nonexistent shoulder, or if you’re very lucky, a small lay-by, while you pass each other. The British drivers seemed to have no trouble with this. This was normal for them. The Canadians who are more used to having large roads with large shoulders and more space in our country than we know what to do with, were a little more nervous!

Once we got to each location we found, though- it was so worth it! First off, we came to a beach in Porthcurno.

The water was cold, but the beach was sandy and the sun was warm. We didn’t have our beach clothes or anything for a beach day (not even towels), we were just there for the views!

Next, we as we were driving along the nail-biting roads, I notice a circle of stones in the field next to us. Obviously, other people knew about it because there was a very small car park there so Eric pulled over quickly and we got out to investigate. We quickly looked at Google Maps and learned that they were the Merry Maidens stone circle, circa 2500-1500BC. We were the only ones there and it was so neat to just stumble upon ancient history and walk amongst it.

After that more calm and idle stop, we needed to drive into Mousehole. Oh, Mousehole….

Mousehole was a tiny little idyllic fishing village that had about one bike lane in and one bike lane out. Really. Yet those bike lanes are being used by vehicles both large and small in both directions. Really. One vehicle can barely fit in some of those roads but they were okay with making them 2-way roads? We totally got caught – on a hill – with oncoming traffic and no where to go. Rock wall on one side, building on another. Took about 20 mins and a lot of stress, but Eric managed us out of it. No scratches on the car, either! Beer at lunch was well-deserved!


After Mousehole and the hours of intense driving, we decided to take it easy and go ‘home’ for the day.

On day 3, we had big plans and got up bright and early to head to St. Michael’s Mount.

This was only about a 10-minute drive from where we were staying so it wasn’t that hard to get to in the morning. Sometimes you can walk right to the island over an underwater causeway if the tide is way out (thus, it wouldn’t be underwater), but we very purposely looked up the tide schedule because we wanted to take a boat over. It’s about 1 km to the island and we knew we’d have to save all my legs’ energy to get UP that mountain and not waste it in the walk TO the mountain.
So luckily, the tide was in at 10am (when I have fresh ‘morning legs’ anyway) and we happily spent the £2 each to take the boat over to the mountain. The climb up to the castle was pretty steep and hard in some parts, literally scrambling over stones and boulders – not just a walk up stairs. Once we got up to the castle, they spoke of how many royals had visited, including The Queen in 2013, and my only thought was – how??? How the heck did The Queen, at about 85, get up there? Holy Heck! Queen Victoria and Charles and Camilla have also visited. How?

Anyway, we really had a grand time. It was absolutely beautiful. The views, the interior, the history. If you’re ever in Cornwall, this should not be missed!! (And it turned out to be quite fortuitous that we went early, because it was getting *SO* busy by the time we left at noon). I can’t imagine how swamped it would be by the time everyone could walk across.


On our last day, we checked out of our rental caravan early and decided to stop at Falmouth for breakfast. It was a bank holiday and the streets were quiet. Most businesses were closed but it was a pretty little town to walk through.


After breakfast in Falmouth, we were off to our booked entry slot at the Eden Project. If you’ve never heard of the Eden Project (the world’s biggest greenhouse), please click on the link and learn about it! It was really, really amazing. It’s a conservationist project in an old quarry in Cornwall where they grow and cultivate species of plants from all over, in the hopes of teaching and guiding new generations about the importance of our one earth and everything that it provides.

And it sure was beautiful.

Inside the rainforest biome

Incidentally, I will give a HUGE shout-out to Eden’s accessibility team because we’ve been to a lot of museums and castles and places where we know they have wheelchairs for use on site and we ask for them, and we have seen the entire spectrum of helpful staff from nice people to staff who almost needed a picture of a wheelchair drawn for them and then needed to call their manager and find out where they were stored… yes, really. At Eden, we were so helpfully lead to the Blue Badge (handicapped) parking by the attendants, and then surprised to find manual wheelchairs parking in dry bays right at the handicapped parking lot. Convenient! Then when we got inside, because I had read on their website that they had a few motorised wheelchairs available (which I’ve never seen at any museum before!!!), I just asked at the front desk and was lucky enough to snag the last one! They kindly showed me how to use it, it had been fully cleaned and charged and was ready to go. As far as accessible museum visits go, this one got 5+ stars!! I would have never, ever been able to walk all around the whole site, as far as we did, and this way I was fully able to enjoy our visit with some independence.



After our beautiful visit to the Eden Project, it was time to hit the road home. We had a fabulous few days in Cornwall, we couldn’t have ordered more perfect weather, nothing but blue skies and warm days. We got to see some really fantastic sights, neat history, beautiful architecture, and do things we’d never get the opportunity to do elsewhere. We also made some fantastic memories with important, much-needed family time.

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