Preparing for our house-hunting trip…

What a relief!

Well, here in Canada, our house has SOLD and we’re now days away from our house hunting trip. The military sends Eric and me over to Bristol to look at and find a suitable house, then hopefully get a lease signed etc. We can also take this time to set up banking, look at schools, check in to Eric’s new office, and explore the area.

In the last few weeks whenever I’ve told people we’re going on this trip, they make some sort of exclamation about how lucky we are, to get a free trip over! Sure, I say, if we didn’t have *so* much work to do in only 5 business days, and if only we didn’t have to leave our T1D daughter behind and hope everything works out okay…

(Okay yes, the military would actually pay to bring her as well, but seeing as its the second-last week of school, and it’s such a long trip and a 8-hour time difference, we thought leaving her at home would actually be the least amount of worry and headache).

So how do new(ish) T1D parents prepare to leave their T1D daughter with her grandparents for 9 days and hope she doesn’t die?
Well, they over-prepare!

Our Everything Binder
Our Everything Binder

We need to remember that my parents are new T1D grandparents too…. and we live in BC and they live in Ontario, so they haven’t had a lot of time to practice! We knew this trip has been coming though, so we had my mom come visit in February for a week and she had an introductory course in diabetic care then.
My mom is also a retired registered nurse, so while diabetes is fairly new to her (she worked in the OR and her patients were usually unconscious) and today’s diabetic tech is definitely new to her – she’s not completely starting at square one.

So I wrote an Everything Binder.

My parents are coming in a few days before we leave, for a crash course/reminder/update in all things diabetic, but I’m still trying to write everything down, including everything routine and everything possible that may come up. Everything.

Examples of pages in the everything binder:
-how to deal with nighttime highs and lows
-how to use Dexcom trend arrows for dosing insulin
-how to best use an extended bolus if they eat out
-a list of good carb-free snacks, if my dad feels like popping to the grocery store
-step-by-step instructions on how to change an Omnipod and Dexcom (though we will change the Dexcom the day before we leave and hope they don’t need to)
-how to calibrate the Dexcom
-how to use glucagon
-codes and passwords for our house (door lock, WiFi, garage)
-a step-by-step guide to our TV and remote control (my parents are 70!)
-a map of the area with places they may need to find highlighted (stores, bank, pharmacy)
-a list of emergency phone numbers – everything from the nurses at the diabetic clinic to some neighbours and even another local T1D parent who could help out


It’s a rather large book of information, and I’m still worried it’s not enough. We will also be on-call 24/7 (all except the time we’re in the air, on our 10-hour-long flights).


In the end, we have to accept that it’s okay if she runs on the high side for the week (higher than we would keep her at), so long as she feels okay and is happy.

In the end, we have to accept that our daughter is almost 11 and smart as a whip, and can very well do most all of this on her own (including more complicated carb-counting and fractions and math than most adults!).

In the end, we have to accept that it’s okay to let go.


This is pretty terrifying to me, to leave her for the first time as a T1D (we left countless times before diagnosis and never cared!!!), but I know it’s got to be done eventually – may as well be now!

How do you prepare to leave your diabetic children with caregivers for extended periods of time?

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